colour bars   Conference Logo  
       

Registration now open!

► Registration form (PDF)

► Register online



► Home


► Keynote Speakers


Preliminary Program

► Tuesday, April 14

► Thursday, April 16

► Friday, April 17


PDFs for Download

► CMA 2020 Exhibitor and Sponsorship Information

► CMA 2020 Exhibitors List and Expo Floor Plan


 

Wednesday, April 15 — Workshops

 
 
 
 

The CMA National Conference 2020 Workshops are all about providing you with the tools you need to help you find solutions to issues you currently face. We’ve programmed three full-day Workshops and six half-day Workshops. Workshop facilitators are recognized experts in their field and have stellar reputations as Workshop leaders. Please select the Workshop that best meets your needs. Priority will be given to individuals who register for the full conference. A higher fee will be charged for individuals only attending Workshops. As space is limited, we would encourage you to register as soon as possible.

All events will be held at the Sheraton Montreal Hotel unless otherwise noted.

 
 

8 am – 5 pm

Registration

 
 
 
 

9 am – 3:30 pm

Full-Day Workshops

 
 

Digital Storytelling: A Beginner’s Guide

Facilitators: Marquis Côté, Director, Digital Technologies, Canadian Museum of History and Canadian War Museum; Megan Richardson, Director, Virtual Museum of Canada and Canadian Museum of History

In a world where the pace of organizational learning is often slower than the pace of technological change, stories endure. Stories are at the heart of museums, connecting people with objects and with each other. Digital technologies are powerful tools for sharing stories and for the past decade, digital storytelling has claimed its place in museum practice. Participants in this Workshop will learn the basics of digital storytelling and how to apply them in their museums to create affordable meaningful visitor experiences. The relationships between story, audience, experience and technology will be explored and illustrated with best practices from the field. Specific technologies demonstrated will include augmented reality, virtual reality, mixed reality, hyper reality and 360-degree video. Through a series of fast, fun activities and group discussion, participants will try out their digital storytelling skills. You will leave the Workshop with a list of resources and tools to craft digital storytelling projects at your own institution.

Fee: $150. Includes two networking breaks, lunch and digital session notes. The Workshop will be conducted primarily in English; participants are welcome to speak in French and the group will collaboratively give informal translation support. Limited to 30 participants.

About your Facilitators: Marquis Côté and his team are tasked to innovate, design, develop, deploy and support the overall digital experience at the Canadian Museum of History, Canadian Children’s Museum and the Canadian War Museum. Before joining the museums in 2014, Marquis owned and operated a creative digital agency for over 20 years, delivering digital strategies and solutions to 200+private and public-sector clients. Megan Richardson and her team operate a national digital cultural investment program with annual calls for proposals, dozens of projects in development and a rich web presence. Megan has more than 25 years of experience in museum education, digital technologies and management at national museums, advocating for a visitor-centered, evidence-based approach and for using digital as a tool for access and engagement around museum collections.




Climate Change and Heritage Places

Facilitators: Sylvie Laneuville, Manager Conservation Sciences and Preventive Conservation, Collections, Curatorial and Conservation Branch, Parks Canada; David Scarlett, Chief Architect, Senior Built Heritage Advisor, Parks Canada; Emily Turgeon-Brunet, Preventive Conservation Specialist, Collections, Curatorial and Conservation Branch, Parks Canada

During this Workshop participants will explore climate change and the impact of extreme weather events, important and growing external factors that affect the future of Canadian heritage places. Customized for the audience and representative of the larger Montreal/Quebec context, this Workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to brainstorm predictable impacts of climate change to specific heritage places, to determine the level of risk associated with these impacts, to do a first analysis of climate change impacts including impacts for priority attention, impacts worthy of longer-term consideration and impacts of lower priority and to develop adaptation options for climate scenarios that could play out within the next 25 years. Best practices and shared experiences will also be discussed. Attendees will leave with a more comprehensive understanding of the impact of climate change on your own institution and how you can possibly mitigate it.

Fee: $150. Includes two networking breaks, lunch and digital session notes and a three-hour field trip to visit the case study site. The Workshop will be conducted primarily in English; participants are welcome to speak in French and the group will collaboratively give informal translation support. Limited to 15 participants.




Prescribing the Museum: Theory in Practice

Facilitators: Kathleen Brown, COO, Lord Cultural Resources; Marilyn Lajeunesse, Educational Programs Officer – Adults and Community Groups and Stephen Legari, Educational Program Officer – Art Therapy, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

This full-day Workshop will provide a theoretical base, practical framework and tools for arts and wellness initiatives at museums. We will begin with an introduction and review of the movement towards incorporating museums and art into wellness initiatives. The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) will be used as a case study highlighting the success of program design and implementation. Workshop participants will experience the protocol in action, coming to understand the methodologies used at MMFA and work directly with the collection on-site. Finally, the Workshop will conclude with a problem-solving session. Taking inspiration from the clinical environment we will ask participants to bring their cases and to work through how to adapt their own museum and wellness programs with the help of other program officers. Participants will leave with tools and knowledge for success in planning for the intersection of culture and wellness.

Fee: $150. This Workshop will be held offsite at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Includes two networking breaks, lunch, session notes and work sheets after the completion of the Workshop. The Workshop will be conducted primarily in English; participants are welcome to speak in French and the group will collaboratively give informal translation support. Limited to 20 participants.

About your Facilitators: Kathleen Brown, COO of Lord Cultural Resources, provides 30-plus years of experience as a respected consultant with proven management skills. Her workshops are interactive, informative and leave clients and other participants inspired and informed for their organizations’ future. Stephen Legari is an art therapist and program officer for art therapy at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Before joining the MMFA full time in 2017, Stephen worked as a therapist in the alternative school system, in childhood development, in addictions recovery and adolescent outpatient psychiatry. In his role at the MMFA, Stephen is responsible for developing partnerships in art therapy programming, supervising interns, contributing to research in museum art therapy, facilitating groups and managing the Art Hive community open studio. Marilyn Lajeunesse has worked at the Education and Community Programs Department of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts since 1992. She is currently Educational Programs Officer for Adults and Community Groups. She is currently involved and helping design several Art for wellness initiatives such as the eating disorder program with the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, the St. Justine Hospital program and numerous joint programs with Concordia University’s Arts Therapies and Art Education Department.


 

Exhibit Design: From Start to Finish

Facilitators: Genevieve Angio-Morneau, Erika Kiessner, Jeremy Taylor, GSM Project

Join experts from GSM Project for a day of exhibition design workshopping, exploring the full timeline of an exhibit experience, from idea through conception to realization. Attendees will be invited to choose a topic, explore conceptual approaches, elaborate through a design process, and finally, produce a prototype. Over the course of the day, emphasis will be placed on clarity of vision and coherence of concept, along with careful consideration of important considerations like feasibility, budget and the context of the project. Attendees are encouraged to bring a real-life exhibit idea that needs workshopping … or simply to dream up the next project! The day will include open brainstorming, working in teams and break-out sessions with GSM Project graphic designers, copywriters, interactive designers, technical directors and more.

Fee: $150. Includes two networking breaks and lunch. The workshop will be conducted in both English and French. Transportation to GSM Project studio not included. GSM is two metro stations from the conference hotel or just a 15-minute walk. Limited to 20 participants.

About your Facilitators: Founded in Montreal in 1958, GSM Project is a multidisciplinary design and production firm with offices in Paris, Dubai, and Singapore. GSM collaborates with partners across a variety of industries, including museums, science centres, brands and real estate developers, to create unforgettable visitor experiences. Recent projects include Ottawa’s new Bank of Canada Museum, the Museum of Ingenuity J. Armand Bombardier and the Canadian History Hall at the Canadian Museum of History.

 
 
 
 

9 am – noon

Half-Day Workshops

 
 

Displaying Collections Outside the Museum: Weighing the Risks, Making Decisions

Facilitators: Marianne Breault and Irene Karsten, Canadian Conservation Institute

Heritage professionals increasingly feel pressured to display collection objects outside museum galleries but approach such display with caution since artifacts may become damaged. Ongoing research by the Canadian Conservation Institute and partner institutions has expanded our understanding of the magnitude of risks associated with the display of collection objects in non-museum interior spaces. In this half-day Workshop, participants will be introduced to how risks to collections are analyzed and the factors that distinguish risks associated with display in non-museum spaces versus traditional exhibition galleries. Through interactive exercises that incorporate their own experiences, participants will learn to identify risk factors in specific situations, predict the type and degree of damage and estimate relative risk magnitude. Applying this knowledge to case study examples, participants will make decisions on whether to engage in display outside the museum and how much to invest in risk mitigation. The Workshop will end with a lively discussion on acceptable risk for use of heritage collections to increase access to collections or attract new audiences.

Fee: $75. Includes a networking break and digital session notes. The Workshop will be offered in French in the morning and English in the afternoon. Limited to 20 participants per Workshop.

About your Facilitators: As Senior Preservation Development Advisor at the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI), Irene Karsten has advised heritage institutions on preventive conservation care of collections, facilities’ upgrades and emergency preparedness in addition to managing collections risk assessment projects since 2009. Marianne Breault joined the CCI’s Preservation Services Department in June 2019 as a post-graduate intern. With a background in painting conservation, she has been assisting with research projects and facility evaluations with regards to preventive conservation care of collections.




Learning the Museum: From Sage-On-A-Stage to Engaging Visitors

Facilitator: Brian McAlonie, BMC Consulting

Education within the cultural sector has changed dramatically since turn of the twentieth century, where the focus is no longer on curators “teaching visitors,” but on assisting visitors with individual meaning-making to help spark visitor interactions, make connections and new discoveries, present differing viewpoints, elicit responses and motivate engagement and action. Long gone is the museum as a “sage-on-a-stage,” now they are agents for inquiry and discovery-based learning. Today’s museums must offer experiences that no longer perceive visitors as students, but as lifelong learners who are capable of thinking for themselves, are knowledgeable and curious, can question answers and understand the world around them. This approach no longer places emphasis on the museum to educate but to assist visitors with learning on their terms. The first half of the Workshop will examine current museological learning best practices while the latter will be devoted to workshopping the concepts presented in the first half.

Fee: $95. Includes a networking break and digital session notes. The Workshop will be offered in English only. Attendees should consider attending Brian’s second Workshop in the afternoon, Human-Centered Design for Visitor-Centered Museums. Limited to 30 participants.

About your Facilitators: For almost 25 years, Brian McAlonie has utilized his broad range of expertise in the communications, design and museum fields to assist clients with creating engaging and profitable visitor service experiences. Combining an M.A. in museum studies from the University of Leicester, England and his vast professional experience, Brian assists cultural institutions and heritage organizations with creating and implementing master visitor experience plans, museum exhibitions, interpretive plans and museum stores to build sustainable audiences and revenues. Specifically, Brian is responsible for board and staff visioning facilitation, strategic planning, creative strategy development, interpretive planning, brainstorming and client communications. Brian speaks regularly to various national and international museum professionals. Brian is currently writing a book for Roman & Littlefield Publishers about how to create engaging visitor-centered museum experiences.




Navigating Copyright: What Museums and Galleries Need to Know

Facilitator: Alex Herman, Institute of Art and Law

Copyright — it touches on almost all areas of practice in museums and galleries, yet many museum professionals do not feel confident in dealing with it on a daily basis. This can be true whether you use third-party copyright or your institution itself holds copyright. This half-day Workshop aims to arm attendees with the knowledge and skills to tackle copyright in your institution. Topics of discussion will include the rules for copyright subsistence, authorship and ownership, infringement and the exceptions that can be used to protect museum activity. From digitization to exhibitions, fair dealings to permissions, the basics to the latest updates will be covered allowing plenty of time for questions from participants. This Workshop is recommended for collection managers, registrars, curators, directors and trustees.

Fee: $175. Includes networking break and digital session notes/slides. The Workshop will be conducted primarily in English with a significant French component; participants are welcome to speak in French and the group will collaboratively give informal translation support. Limited to 30 participants.

About your Facilitators: Alex Herman is the Assistant Director of the UK-based Institute of Art and Law, where he oversees the education and research arms of the organization. As such he has convened Diploma courses for museum professionals throughout the UK, in Australia, in the Middle East and in Canada. He has also led in-house training for some of the world’s leading museums, including the Victoria & Albert Museum, the British Museum and the National Museum of Qatar. He developed and co-convenes a Master’s degree in Art, Business and Law at Queen Mary University of London in the UK. A bilingual Canadian, Alexander worked as a lawyer in Montreal after studying law at McGill University.


Curatorial Dreaming Workshop

Facilitator: Shelley Ruth Butler, Principal, Curatorial Dreaming Workshops & Lecturer, McGill Institute for the Study of Canada

The premise of this participatory Workshop is that people who work at, visit and study museums have an untapped wealth of experience, opinions, sources and pedagogical ideas that can be developed in response to specific objects and displays. In this Workshop, participants will be guided to develop concrete, conceptual and creative responses to displays in the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) by changing texts, re-arranging galleries, adding and taking away objects, or moving them to alternative everyday spaces. Thematically, the focus will be on developing curatorial interventions related to difficult histories and legacies, including colonialism, everyday power relations and elitism. It will highlight varied, interdisciplinary strategies for addressing difficult histories. Working in small groups, participants will experiment in a personally meaningful, task-oriented setting without typical professional political, practical and institutional constraints. Participants will gain fresh, often low-cost, ideas for dealing with difficult subject matter in varied museum and vernacular sites.

Fee: $95. This Workshop will be held offsite at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Includes lunch and digital session notes. Delegates are responsible for making their own way to and from the MMFA. The Workshop will be conducted primarily in English; participants are welcome to speak in French and the group will collaboratively give informal translation support. Limited to 16 participants.

About your Facilitator: Dr. Shelley Ruth Butler is an award-winning teacher at McGill University. She teaches, researches, writes and consults about museums and heritage, specializing in issues related to race, official or dominant culture, historical consciousness and communication across cultural and socio-economic divides. Trained as a cultural anthropologist with expertise in Canada and South Africa, she is co-editor of Curatorial Dreams: Critics Imagine Exhibitions (2016) and author of the widely taught museum ethnography, Contested Representations: Revisiting Into the Heart of Africa (1999 & 2011).

 
 
 
 

1 – 4 pm

Half-Day Workshops

 
 

Displaying Collections Outside the Museum: Weighing the Risks, Making Decisions

Facilitated by: The Canadian Conservation Institute

Please see morning session for session description.

Fee: $75. Includes a networking break and digital session notes. The Workshop will be offered in French in the morning and English in the afternoon. Limited to 20 participants per Workshop.




Human-Centered Design for Visitor-Centered Museums

Facilitator: Brian McAlonie, BMC Consulting

Currently, Human-centered design is being utilized and embraced worldwide as a viable tool to assist communities with problem-solving. The Human-centered design framework “develops solutions to problems by involving the human perspective in all steps of the problem-solving process. Human involvement typically takes place in observing the problem within context, brainstorming, conceptualizing, developing and implementing the solution.” World-renowned design firm IDEO uses this approach to solve problems for their clients with the fundamental understanding that the process needs to start with “people you are designing for” so that solutions “are tailor-made to suit their needs.” Similarly, museums can only become visitor-centered by addressing and meeting the wants, needs and desires of their visitors.

The first half of the Workshop introduces participants to Human-centered design approaches, concepts and best practices, while the second half places these ideas into practice by utilizing the approach to solve museological issues with participants. Attendees will leave with a solid understanding of what Human-centered design is, how to apply it to museum visitor experiences and how it can contribute to a visitor-centered museum approach.

Fee: $95. Includes networking break and digital session notes. The Workshop will be conducted in English. Attendees should consider taking Brian’s morning Workshop, Learning in the Museum: From Sage-On-Stage to Engaging Visitors. Limited to 30 participants.

About your Facilitators: For almost 25 years, Brian McAlonie has utilized his broad range of expertise in the communications, design and museum fields to assist clients with creating engaging and profitable visitor service experiences. Combining an M.A. in museum studies from the University of Leicester, England and his vast professional experience, Brian assists cultural institutions and heritage organizations with creating and implementing master visitor experience plans, museum exhibitions, interpretive plans and museum stores to build sustainable audiences and revenues. Specifically, Brian is responsible for board and staff visioning facilitation, strategic planning, creative strategy development, interpretive planning, brainstorming and client communications. Brian speaks regularly to various national and international museum professionals. Brian is currently writing a book for Roman & Littlefield Publishers about how to create engaging visitor-centered museum experiences.




Certification of Cultural Property: Looking to the Future

Facilitators: Sharilyn J. Ingram, Mijin Kim, and Chantelle Lépine-Cercone Executive Director, Secretariat to the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board.

For over 40 years Canadian museums have been developing their collections with the assistance of acquisitions of cultural property certified by the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board (CCPERB). Recent court challenges and legislative amendments have changed the ground rules. With the understanding that strategic use of certification opportunities is critical to the development of a museum’s collection and donor base, this half-day Workshop will provide participants with updates, a review of the program goals and objectives, clarification of benefits and detailed hands-on guidance to preparing effective applications, including writing justifications and ensuring appropriate appraisals. A practice session will be enhanced by ample opportunity for questions and discussions and participant input will be sought for improvements to the process.

Fee: FREE! Limited to 40 participants. You must be a registered delegate to attend!.

 
 
 
 

4:30 to 6 pm

 
 

Keynote Address

Museums and the Climate Emergency: A Call to Action

Moderator: Patricia Kell, Parks Canada

Presenters, Robert Janes, Coalition of Museums for Climate Justice and Andrew Potts, International Council on Monuments and Sites’ Climate Change and Heritage Working Group

What does a global climate emergency mean for those of us in culture and heritage? What responsibilities do we have? And what do we stand to lose? In his book Museum Activism, co-authored with Richard Sandell , Dr. Robert R. Janes addresses what he calls the “immorality of inaction,” arguing that the climate emergency is more than simply a political or scientific issue and instead should be considered in a light of moral and social responsibility. At the same time, in his role as a coordinator of the Climate Heritage Network, Andrew Potts works to encourage arts, culture and heritage professionals to leverage the considerable talent towards helping the communities they serve to meet the ambitions of the Paris agreement. A bold departure from the typical format, this keynote will bring together two speakers from either side of the Canada/US border who will share a long look at the urgency of our situation and offer examples of how those of us in museums can make more of a difference.

Kindly supported by:
 
 
 
 

6:00 – 7:00 pm

ICOM Canada Annual General Meeting

Open to members only.

 
 
 
 

6:30 to 9:30 pm

Evening Event

 
 

Dive into the History of Montreal at Pointe-à-Callière

Take part in a memorable historical, artistic, technological and culinary experience at Pointe-à-Callière, Montreal’s largest archaeology and history museum. Network with colleagues and enjoy food from their new superstar chef. Located in the heart of Old Montreal on ground that witnessed more than 1,000 years of human activity, from the early settlements of Indigenous people to the present day, the museum enables you to discover remarkable remains and collections displayed in situ on the very site where Montreal was founded. During your visit, you will view material traces left behind by Indigenous peoples at the Pointe-à-Callière historical site and the remains of Montreal’s first Catholic cemetery. You will traverse the first collector sewer built in North America, walk beneath the site of Fort Ville-Marie and can even talk to virtual characters from New France. Along with discovering the museum’s permanent exhibitions, where cutting-edge technologies bring history to life, you can view the new multimedia show Generations MTL. Projected onto an extraordinary immersive set space, this multimedia experience will allow you to relive key moments from Montreal’s history and dazzle you with both its technological wizardry and artistic sensibility. During this special evening, as you explore Montreal’s rich past, you will also get to taste the products of the region. Enjoy a wide variety of hors d’oeuvres by Quebec’s well-known seasoned chef, food writer and culinary personality, Philippe Mollé, who recently joined the institution as its chef.

Fee: $95. This event is in addition to the all-inclusive registration fee! Open to delegates and guests. Fee covers a full evening including transportation, museum access, special programming, generous hors d'œuvres and your choice of wine, beer or non-alcoholic beverages.